Congenital Heart Defect Awareness Week

Every year February 7-14 is declared as CHD Awareness Week!  

CHD Awareness Week is an annual awareness effort to help educate the public about Congenital Heart Defects. Congenital Heart Disease is considered to be the most common birth defect, and is a leading cause of birth-defect related deaths worldwide. Despite the fact that CHD affects approximately 1.8 million families in the U.S., a relatively small amount of funding is currently available for parent/patient educational services, research, and support. By sharing the experiences of those affected and providing information, we hope to raise public awareness about conditions that affect approximately 40,000 babies each year in the United States alone. It is our hope that efforts to educate the public will result in improved early diagnosis, additional funding for support and educational services, scientific research, and access to quality of care for our children and adults. www.tchin.org

On, Thursday, Feb. 10, 2014, Georgia Governor Nathan Deal presented a Proclamation declaring Feb. 7 to 14 as CHD Awareness Week in Georgia. Children’s Sibley Heart Center patients, families and staff joined Governor Deal at the State Capitol at the signing of the proclamation. 

Kids at Heart Congenital Heart Defect Awareness Week

Patients, families and staff with Governor Deal
during Congenital Heart Defect Awareness Week

 

(L-R) Jack Sanders, Dallin Bond, Joshua Hardin, Matthew Caymol, Matthew Gunther, Jordan Hardin

 

Congenital Heart Defect Awareness Week Congenital Heart Defect Awareness Week
Angie and Matthew Caymol  Jordan Hardin with proclamation 

 

More About CHD Awareness Week

CHD Awareness Week is an annual awareness effort to help educate the public about Congenital Heart Defects. Congenital Heart Disease is considered to be the most common birth defect, and is a leading cause of birth-defect related deaths worldwide. Despite the fact that CHD affects approximately 1.8 million families in the U.S., a relatively small amount of funding is currently available for parent/patient educational services, research, and support. By sharing the experiences of those affected and providing information, we hope to raise public awareness about conditions that affect approximately 40,000 babies each year in the United States alone.