Robert Schnepp, MD, PhD

Gender

Male

Language

English

Dr. Schnepp is an attending physician in pediatric hematology/oncology at Children's Healthcare and serves as the William G. Woods, MD, Aflac Clinical Investigator Chair in the Aflac Cancer and Blood Disorders Center of Children’s. He is also Assistant Professor at Emory.

Dr. Schnepp is a member of the Cancer Cell Biology Research Program at Winship Cancer Institute of Emory. He earned his master’s and doctorate training at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, where he studied the genetic cancer syndrome multiple endocrine neoplasia type I, investigating the role of the tumor suppressor menin. Next, he pursued further training in pediatrics at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, completing his residency and fellowship in pediatric hematology/oncology. During that time, he investigated the mechanistic basis of aberrant oncogenic signaling in neuroblastoma, a tumor of the developing nervous system.

Dr. Schnepp's laboratory is interested in better understanding the cellular signaling networks that neuroblastoma and other aggressive pediatric solid malignancies engage to sustain the malignant phenotype, seeking to improve existing therapies and outcomes for patients.

Locations

Aflac Cancer and Blood Disorders Center

Egleston hospital, 1405 Clifton Road NE
Atlanta, GA 30322
Get Directions 404-785-1112

Aflac Cancer and Blood Disorders Center

Scottish Rite hospital, 1001 Johnson Ferry Road NE
Atlanta, GA 30342
Get Directions 404-785-5252

Aflac Cancer and Blood Disorders Center

Medical Office Building at Scottish Rite hospital, 5461 Meridian Mark Road NE Suite 400
Atlanta, GA 30342
Get Directions 404-785-1112

Focus of Practice

  • Hematology/oncology
  • Solid tumor

Professional Affiliations

  • American Association for Cancer Research
  • Children’s Oncology Group (COG)
  • American Society of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology
  • Advances in Neuroblastoma Research

Research Interests

Understanding the cellular signaling networks that neuroblastoma and other pediatric solid malignancies engage to sustain the malignant phenotype, Improving existing therapies and outcomes for patients