Children's Healthcare of Atlanta Receives First Grant from Enduring Hearts to Support Pediatric Heart Transplant Research


Mya knew all about each of her wires and its functionATLANTA, GA (May 21, 2014)Enduring Hearts, a nonprofit organization that awards operating grants to established members of academic staff at universities, transplant centers, and research institutes for research projects in organ transplantation, announced today the approval of their first research grant of approximately $25,000 to Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta and Emory University. The research will focus on Chimerism of Cardiac Myocytes in a transplanted heart.

“Through Enduring Heart’s research grant, we hope to gain a better understanding of the transplant recipient’s contribution to a transplanted heart, which will help us identify new targets for therapies that would prolong the life and quality of these transplanted organs and the patients themselves,” said Shriprasad Deshpande, M.D., M.S., Pediatric Cardiologist and Associate Director of Mechanical Circulatory System Program at Children’s Sibley Heart Center and Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at Emory University.

Enduring Hearts seeks to enhance lives by funding research to increase the longevity of organ transplants. The results of the funded research projects will contribute to the knowledge about many aspects of the clinical and scientific transplantation, including the mechanisms of long-term organ deterioration, the consequence of tissue injury and the opportunities to intervene in these processes.

"Thanks to the support of everyone who believes in our cause, we are pleased to announce that Enduring Hearts is funding its first research effort to improve the long-term outcomes of pediatric transplant recipients like our daughter Mya,” said Patrick Gahan, Treasurer of Enduring Hearts.

A transplanted heart is very unique in how it ‘adopts’ to a new body; quite unlike any other transplanted organ. The new host contributes very little to ongoing upkeep and repair of a transplanted heart. This limits to a large degree how long the transplanted organ is able to survive. The host, however, does play major role in rejecting the organ via immunologic mechanisms as well as the aging process via development of coronary blood vessel disease.

“Our understanding of the host contribution to the transplanted heart is very limited and derived from some very basic studies,” said Deshpande. “Here, we are attempting to answer these questions using state of art research tools.”





For more information:
Chrissie Gallentine
Public Relations Coordinator 
404-785-7614 

About Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta
Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta, a not-for-profit organization, is dedicated to making kids better today and healthier tomorrow. Our specialized care helps children get better faster and live healthier lives. Managing more than 850,000 patient visits annually at three hospitals and 24 neighborhood locations, Children’s is the largest healthcare provider for children in Georgia and one of the largest pediatric clinical care providers in the country. Children’s offers access to more than 60 pediatric specialties and programs and is ranked among the top children’s hospitals in the country by U.S.News & World Report. With generous philanthropic and volunteer support, Children’s has impacted the lives of children in Georgia, the United States and throughout the world.

About the Children’s Sibley Heart Center 
Treating more than 35,000 children annually, the Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta Sibley Heart Center provides comprehensive cardiac services for congenital and acquired heart disease from infancy through young adulthood, as well as prenatal diagnostics. Ranked one of the country’s top pediatric cardiac programs by U.S.News & World Report, the Sibley Heart Center is recognized for innovative treatments and leading‐edge research. Visit www.choa.org/heart or call 404‐256‐2593 or 800‐542‐2233 for more information.

About the Robert W. Woodruff Health Sciences Center of Emory University
The Robert W. Woodruff Health Sciences Center of Emory University is an academic health science and service center focused on missions of teaching, research, health care and public service. Its components include schools of medicine, nursing, and public health; Yerkes National Primate Research Center; the Emory Winship Cancer Institute; and Emory Healthcare, the largest, most comprehensive health system in Georgia.



Enduring Hearts

Enduring Hearts is a nonprofit organization that awards operating grants to established members of academic staff at universities, transplant centers, and research institutes for research projects in organ transplantation. Enduring Hearts seeks to enhance lives by funding research to increase the longevity of organ transplants. The results of the funded research projects will contribute to the knowledge about many aspects of the clinical and scientific transplantation, e.g. the mechanisms of long-term organ deterioration, the consequence of tissue injury and the opportunities to intervene in these processes.  For more information, visit www.enduringhearts.org, or follow the foundation at www.facebook.com/enduringheartsorg or www.twitter.com/enduringhearts.


Tags: General News, Cardiac, Transplant, Cardiology, Cardiothoracic surgery, Research
Published: Wednesday, May 21, 2014